Be aware of the bankruptcy warning signs in your own life!

warningThere are many warning signs that can appear in person’s financial life that can signal that a person is insolvent and in need of warning 4declaring bankruptcy.  If you can recognize these signs then it is possible for you to prepare to file for bankruptcy.  A timely bankruptcy filing can avoid the pitfalls of irreversible financial mistakes.  I often discover that my clients have made these mistakes prior to coming to see me.

I wanted to warn people in this blog so they could consider bankruptcy when the financial danger first appears so they can avoid the mistakes that come with the failure to recognize the warning signs of an impending bankruptcy.  If these signs appear you may be in a situation where bankruptcy makes more sense than continuing with a charade or outright lie that you are “someday” going to pay your debts.

Many people continue with this denial for years and years and some make many financial mistakes because of it.  Some will cash in their retirement funds or sell other property to raise cash in an attempt to pay down their debts.   Retirement funds and many other types of property are exempt in bankruptcy.  It is always a mistake to cash in retirement funds or many other types of property that are exempt in a bankruptcy.   You can keep these assets in a bankruptcy and still get rid of your debts.

Some people will struggle along for long periods paying partial payments to creditors which will often cover only interest on their debts.   This only results in them their spending endless amounts of money which could have been saved had they only admitted to themselves that bankruptcy made sense.  Some will even borrow some money from friends and relatives in an attempt to pay down the debt.  This money is completely wasted and probably lost forever if these people eventually do file a bankruptcy.

1) The first warning sign is when you are paying interest only on credit card or other debts.  If you cannot pay down the debt itself but you are paying interest only then that is a sign of trouble ahead.  Interest rates will rise and just like our government you will eventually reach a point where your interest on your debts takes up a huge share of your income so that you cannot cover your basic monthly expenses for living.   This is an unsustainable situation and one which signals that bankruptcy make s a lot of sense for you.

2) Unemployment or underemployment.  If you have debts that you could afford to pay on when you high paying job but then you lose that job (or you get a job which pays far less) then you may be headed for bankruptcy.  Some will believe that they can magically still pay these debts even though they now need their now reduced income to continue to pay their monthly expenses.

3) When your expenses exceed your income each month before you pay your debts.  If you have no money left over after you pay your current monthly bills to pay past debt payments then it is probably time to consider bankruptcy.

4)  If you have had a vehicle repossessed and you have been hit with a large deficiency balance because of it then you may need a bankruptcy.  Some of my clients have multiple cars repossessed and they thus have multiple deficiency balances that can add up to tens of thousands of dollars.  If they cannot afford to keep up with payments on the vehicles prior to repossession then they will probably not have enough income to pay off the deficiency balance on the old car and somehow secure a new car to drive.

5) Another sign is if you suffered some outrageously high medical debt that is unpayable.  Many of my clients are uninsured or underinsured.  This works for some unless there is a need for an expensive medical procedure.  It is not long before the collectors are calling you to pay tens or even hundreds of thousands of dollars in medical bills.  They will demand that you repay just like any collector and you may not have the income to do it.

6) Then there is the constant steady unabated calls from creditors that you cannot pay so you do not answer your phone.  And this leads me to the all important  psychological  effects of long-term debt upon people.  The constant harassing calls and the knowledge that there is a debt out there that you have no way of paying is a tremendous psychological burden to people.  Bankruptcy lifts this burden, eliminates the debt and the terrible unending stress that goes with it.

7) Some people have multiple court judgments against them for unpaid bills.  These judgments could be for credit cards, deficiency judgments, unpaid medical bills, or debts of any kind for which a creditor has sued you and obtained a court judgment against you.  That creditor can now garnish your wages, seize your property, or demand you come into court for a debtor’s exam.  These “exams” will allow creditors to pry into your finances no matter how much you wish to keep them private.  These are to be avoided at all costs.

8) You may already have garnishments taking 25% of your income.  You now are operating with a reduced income and each creditor is standing in line to get his 25%.  You could pay this virtually forever if you owe enough money to creditors.  Bankruptcy will stop the garnishments, return your income level to what it should be, and banish the debts forever.

All of these are signs that bankruptcy probably would make sense for you and you should get some advice from a bankruptcy attorney.  If you have several of these warning signs (and even if you have only one) then bankruptcy is an option to consider.  There is a little bit of a miracle in bankruptcy.  It can wipe out your debts and free you from your debt burdens.  It is the only way I know of but we don’t need another because it works so well.  So think about if you have any of these signs and if you do then consider bankruptcy.

I am a San Diego bankruptcy attorney.  For further questions please visit my websites at www.farquharlaw.com or www.freshstartsandiego.com.  Or call my office for a free consultation or for any other advice about bankruptcy or debt at (619) 702-5015. Call now for free credit report and analysis!

For a free e-book on “13 things to do to prepare for your bankruptcy filing” please e-mail me at farquharesq@yahoo.com.

Warning sign courtesy of Free Grunge Textures.  Danger sign courtesy of Atomicjeep.

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What is community property and how does it affect my bankrupty?

property 3Community property is, in short, the property you and your spouse acquired while you were married.  It includes any real estate and property 5personal property that you bought while you were married.  So cars, clothes, jewelry, furniture are all considered community property if they were acquired while you were married.  Real estate acquired during the marriage is considered community property in the same way.

It gets a little more complicated when you have a piece of real estate that was yours alone prior to the marriage.  If you get married after you bought the property your new spouse can gain (over time) a community interest in your real estate.

Real estate requires the regular and continuous paying of fees for maintenance, taxes, and even the mortgage payment.  Even if you continue to pay these yourself (with no contribution from your new spouse) your spouse is getting a growing community interest as you make those maintenance payments.

The money you use to pay these ongoing property expenses are community funds even if the funds come from income you earn alone.  This is because every dollar you earn during your marriage is half owned by your spouse.  This works both ways as every dollar your spouse earns is half yours too.  Therefore if you are married and the only one working and you pay these expenses out of your income alone on property that was yours before the marriage, your spouse is still getting a gradual community interest.

So when it comes time to file bankruptcy the trustee will want to know if you are married.  If you are then community property issues arise and he will ask questions about any property you or your spouse own individually or together.  If your spouse files bankruptcy and you do not your spouse may have a community interest in your real estate.  This will be true even if your spouse did nothing to and for the property.

These issues can get complicated so you need an attorney to analyze your property and your spouse’s to see if there are any community property issues.  Property can and will be seized and sold by a trustee if there is any value owned by the person filing bankruptcy if that value is not properly exempted.

Community property does not include property that you alone inherited and that you have kept segregated and separated from your spouse’s property.  If you have not commingled that property with your spouse then that property can be considered separate and not community for bankruptcy and other purposes.

But if you inherited real estate it may have started out as separate property but it may lose its separate property nature over time.  Again as you pay on it you may be giving your spouse a community interest even in separate property that was inherited by you.

There are other issues related to community property such as whether you gifted property to a spouse by putting the title it in their name.  If you do put a spouse on title then there is a presumption of gift and depending upon how title is held that property will probably be considered half owned by the spouse.  It would then lose its separate property status.

I am a San Diego bankruptcy attorney.  For further questions please visit my websites at www.farquharlaw.com or www.freshstartsandiego.com.  Or call my office for a free consultation or for any other advice about bankruptcy or debt at (619) 702-5015.  Call now for free credit report and analysis!

For a free e-book on “13 things to do to prepare for your bankruptcy filing” please e-mail me at farquharesq@yahoo.com.

 

Private property photo courtesy of hworks.  House photo courtesy of danzoO8.

The economy might be improving. It therefore might be a good time to file bankruptcy.

The economy appears as if it might be improving.  If this is true the in a better economy it is more likely that you will obtain a better paying job.  Therefore it might e a good time to file for bankruptcy before you get this job and you become “means tested”out of a chapter 7 bankruptcy.

Believe it or not many people wait too long to file and then they cannot file because they earn too much income or they receive too much property.  If you might get a job with a moderate to high income in the near future they it would be advisable to file for bankruptcy now when you have an underpaid job or if you are altogether unemployed.  You should only file of course if you have large debts you cannot currently pay.   (See here for my website article on why you should file for bankruptcy).

There is a  problem with waiting to file for bankruptcy though.  When you get a good job you may get enough income to survive and pay your bills.  his is a good thing but your income may be too much for you to easily file for bankruptcy.  There is a thing called the means test which will force you to pay back your debts in a chapter 13 if you make too much money.  The artificiality of the means test may create a situation where on paper you have enough money to pay back our debts but in reality you do not.

The means test may show extra income in your household when you look in your account and see none.  That is when you will wish you had filed for bankruptcy and rid yourself of your debts when you could have with no problem.  Don’t let those debts follow you into your new life.  Those old credit card debts are usually attributable to your borrowing money to survive when things were very bad.  They usually do not reflect a wasteful or luxurious lifestyle but mere borrowing to survive.

Also remember that if you are going to receive some property by will, trust, winnings, or gift then that too may make it harder to file for bankruptcy.  This is also true if your home or other asset will increase in value.  Better to file now before these things happen.

Why then let these old debts impact your future life after you come out of the bad times.  You will need the money you will earn from you job to pay for your family’s expenses.  Don’t wait until you get too much income or assets that will push you out of bankruptcy.  Excercise your federal right to file for bankruptcy and rid yourself of these old debts.  Get a fresh start but do it now while you can and your income is low and your assests are few.  You do not know what the future holds.

I am a San Diego bankruptcy attorney.  For more information please visit my websites at www.farquharlaw.com or www.freshstartsandiego.com.  Or call my office for a free consultation at (619) 702-5015.

For a free e-book: “13 THINGS YOU SHOULD DO TO PREPARE FOR YOUR BANKRUPTCY FILING” please send a request by e-mail to: farquharesq@yahoo.com.

Local San Diego restaurant goes bankrupt! Say Goodbye To Pat and Oscar’s.

Apparently another victim of the economic crisis that seems to still be gripping America, Pat and Oscars filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy in September with the last three corporate stores closing on 9/27/11.  A chapter 7 means that they will be liquidating the company and not reorganizing it as they would in a chapter 11.  This could mean the end of Pat and Oscars but possibly it will survive in some form as it was alluded to in an article the “Restaurant News”.

According to that article there are numerous franchised stores out there that are not operated by the corporation but are in fact operated by individuals.  Many of these people undoubtably want to continue with the operation of their restaurants as they have families to feed and bills to pay.  But the question becomes how do they do this when the corporation goes bankrupt?

The company did everything it could in the past to keep the brand alive including cutting costs and creating a new proto-type store.  None of this worked though to save the company as sagging sales and a bad economy has claimed another restaurant victim.  People do tend to eat at home more in a down economy as they have far less disposable income.  I usually tell my clients to eat at home more to cut their expenses after filing a personal bankruptcy.

So nobody blames Pat an Oscars for filing but the individual franchise owners could be left in the lurch.  But according to the article there is possibly a way out for them.  The company itself has been around since 1991 when it was founded by Pay and Oscar Sarkisian.  Sizzler bought it in 2000 for $16 million and Sizzler became Worldwide Restaurant Concepts which was then acquired by Pacific Equity Partners in 2005.  In the bankruptcy the parent company was listed as “FFPE LLC”.

They got a new chief executive in 2008 and they tried to grow the restaurant and that didn’t work.  When they filed bankruptcy there were 14 locations of which 9 were owned by franchisees.  These franchisees could get liquidated too if they are not careful but there is an alternative.  In the article they say they will have to “go to court”.  That is true if they want to save the brand and operate it themselves.

The problem is that they are now part of a bankrupt corporation.  That bankrupt corporation will have debts.  It is the job of the Trustee in any chapter 7 bankruptcy to liquidate any assets the corporation may have to pay creditors.  It is possible though that in the franchise agreement for Pat and Oscars the franchisees are owners of all of the property in their restaurants and they just have some contractual agreement to purchase supplies from the mother corp.  Then their individual store assets would fall outside of the bankrupt estate.

That still leaves the name of Pat and Oscar’s.  That is surely owned by the corp. and the trustee would probably be duty bound to sell the name as that is an asset of the estate.  But according to an article in “Sign on San Diego” the parent company is listing assets of $331,459 and liabilities of $4.1 million so we know that there are considerable debts owed to creditors who will want to get paid from any asset that the Trustee can discover.

But also the article quotes a “consultant” who says that the franchisees will have to first form an association and then petition the court to use the name.  This is possible I believe as they will have to form a new business as the old one is defunct.  It is also possible that the trustee will allow the use of the name if he determines that it has no value to the estate.  It is unlikely that anyone would buy it so the franchisees would at most have to pay a nominal fee for its use and they could possibly use it for free is the trustee abandons the name.

Then they would take this new business and operate their restaurants and they could even change the name to something similar if they can’t get the name or if they don’t want to pay for the name.  This is not unprecedented according to the “Restaurant News” article as “Ground Round” franchisees in Boston operated their 24 restaurants after their parent company went bankrupt.  80 units of “Bennigans Steak and Ale” were similarly operated under a new franchisee owned business after their parent company went bankrupt.

Therefore it is possible that we will see more of Pat and Oscars as it is certainly okay from a bankruptcy perspective to operate a new franchisee owned restaurant chain after a parent company bankrupts.  The question though is if the restaurants can operate profitably in this down economy.  We shall see.

So you still may be able to take the family to Pat and Oscars in the future.

I am a bankruptcy attorney practicing bankruptcy law in San Diego, CA.  Please visit my websites for further information at www.farquharlaw.com or www.freshstartsandiego.com.  Or call my office for a free consultation at (619) 702-5015.  Call now for a free credit report and analysis!

If you or someone you know needs to file a bankruptcy please get my FREE E-BOOK: “13 THINGS YOU SHOULD DO TO PREPARE FOR YOUR BANKRUPTCY FILING” by e-mailing me at farquharesq@yahoo.com.

What’s in your wallet? These huge credit card companies are plenty rich- it’s okay to file for bankruptcy!

Bank of America, Chase, Wells Fargo, Capital One, Citibank, Discover, American Express.  Recognize these guys?  You probably owe them money right now and I’m not talking about for your mortgage, car, or for some other secured asset.  I’m talking about credit cards.  What’s in your wallet?  Probably there is some credit card in there right now with one of these names on it and you are in debt.

If you check you will see that these are very large companies.  They have billions of dollars in assets and if you think about it is a very easy business to run.  Think of them like Joe Pesci in the movie “Casino”.  They get a little money and they “put it on the street”.  But you are the street.  They borrow money at a low-interest rate and lend it to you at a higher rate.  If you default or are just late on the payments then they will jack your interest rates and charge you all sorts of penalties.  They make a tremendous profit on you when you cannot pay them.

Remember they don’t have a plant with machinery where they make things or even an office where they give advice.  They just need a little small space where there is a phone with which they can call you twenty times a day when you don’t pay them.  Are you getting those calls now?  Most of us do and they call now not just when you are a month late or even a few weeks late but if you are a day late.  They seemed to have recently decreased the time they allow you to not pay them.

According to Wikipedia Bank of America is the largest financial services company in America and also the largest bank holding company.  It is the second largest bank in the country by market capitalization.  As of 2010 B of A is the fifth largest company in the U.S. by total revenue and the second largest non-oil company in the U.S. after Wal-Mart!

Wells Fargo is the fourth largest bank in the U.S. by assets but the second largest by market capitalization.  JP Morgan Chase has assets of $2 trillion.  Citigroup has the largest financial services network in the country and it has over 200 million customers.  Get the picture?  They are huge and they won’t miss your debts if you get them discharged in bankruptcy.  Most of the big banks received federal bailouts financed by your tax dollars when they ran into financial difficulty.

Where is your bailout?  Do you get a break when you get into financial difficulty?  These companies are the largest and richest companies in the world and they are deemed “too big to fail” and when they get into trouble they run to the federal government (that’s you) and they ask for and get a bailout so they can make more money.  Did you get a break?  A bailout?  Where can you go when you run into financial trouble?  How about they only call you ten times a day when you owe them money?

Forget about it.  It’s not going to happen.  You will get no breaks from these companies.  They only move one way and that is forward in collecting money from you.  They will call you, hound you, and harass you into paying them.  Your only way out is to file bankruptcy.

Bankruptcy stops the calls, the harassment, and relieves you of the liabilities for those debts.  It makes sense and is the only break you are going to get.

So don’t feel bad for these banks who are too big to fail.  They are the largest and richest entities in the world and they won’t miss your little debts when you file bankruptcy.  They will write it off as a loss on their corporate taxes.  Remember that most people have paid back all of the money they borrowed on their credit cards with interest before they file bankruptcy.  It’s just that the interest rates are so large that they have to keep paying indefinitely.

How long does it take to pay off a card if you make the minimum payment?  I don’t even know anymore but it used to be 30 or 40 years.  That is debt slavery.  Don’t let yourself be a slave!  File for bankruptcy if you have debts you cannot pay!

I am a San Diego bankruptcy attorney.  Please visit my website at www.farquharlaw.com or www.freshstartsandiego.com.  Or call my office for a free consultation on any bankruptcy or debt related issue at (619) 702-5015.  Call now for free credit report and analysis!

For a free e-book: “13 THINGS YOU SHOULD DO TO PREPARE FOR YOUR BANKRUPTCY FILING” please send a request by e-mail to: farquharesq@yahoo.com.

Should American states like California and Illinois file for bankruptcy? Turns out it can be done but with a cost!

A number of the states in the USA are completely broke with little chance of paying off their debts.  California is one that reportedly has a $500 billion unfunded pension liability problem.  $500 billion is obviously more than the citizens of the state of California can pay so some have talked about the possibility of a federal bailout.  I am personally against a bailout because it will only continue the problem of overspending and unfunded pension liabilities that California can’t afford.

Numerous other states have huge debt problem often related to their unfunded pension liabilities.  Hawaii, Connecticut, and Massachusetts, Oregon and New Jersey are among the small states mentioned.  California, Illinois, and New York are the large states with huge debt problems.  One article says as many as 46 states need bankruptcy.  According to reports I’ve read Utah seems to be the best financially managed state in the union and it has little debt.

For many states it was the housing collapse that resulted in a great reduction in tax revenues that started the slide.  For other like California the unfunded pension problem has been building for years.  For states like New Jersey and Nevada, who relied on gambling taxes, times are really tough as people have slowed down on gambling because of the slow economy. But most states that are in financial trouble seem to have some level of this same unfunded pension liability problem.  A state bankruptcy would allow the bankruptcy courts to throw out these pension contracts just like with a city if the law can be changed to allow states to go bankrupt.

As I wrote in a previous blog, states are sovereign entities and they thus cannot go bankrupt.  But there is a way for California and the other states to make it happen anyway.  Congress can pass a law allowing the individual states to declare bankruptcy but the states would have to petition the Congress for such a right.  Without the petition the law won’t change and states will be stuck with their debts.

Congress passed the law that originally created chapter 9 municipal bankruptcy seventy years ago during the great depression.  Chapter 9 allowed cities and counties to file for bankruptcy protection and 600 such entities have taken advantage of this law since it was passed in the 1930s.  Presumably Congress could now authorize a whole new chapter in the bankruptcy code.  We could call it “chapter 10.”  A chapter 10 would eliminate the barriers to states filing and eliminate the “sovereign entity” problem that still exists today.

Apparently Newt Gingrich is in favor of just such a law.  Ironically it is the republicans, who are not normally bankruptcy friendly, who seem to be more in favor of just such a law.  This appears to be because the republicans do not want any state to receive a federal bailout which would impose a tax on the whole country to pay for the worst fiscally managed states.  If  states like California, Illinois and the others would file bankruptcy then a federal bailout would be unnecessary.

With a bankruptcy these states can eliminate their debts such as the unfunded pension liabilities that have plagued cities.  With a bankruptcy the state can also save its assets.  In a chapter 9 bankruptcy the law is clear that the bankruptcy court cannot interfere with the city’s day-to-day activities and the cities can even borrow money during the bankruptcy.

In a chapter 9 municipal bankruptcy the court also cannot force the city to sell any of its assets like city land or buildings.  Presumably this would apply to states’ bankruptcies too.  A state could therefore keep all of its assets during and after the bankruptcy.  As I reported in a previous blog this is because of constitutional protections like separation of powers that prevent a court from interfering with any day-to-day functioning of a city because a city is a public entity.  A public political entity like a city (or a state) simply cannot be operated or directly interfered with by a bankruptcy court.  This is made clear on the federal courts website under chapter 9 bankruptcies.

A state could presumably enjoy these protections in a chapter 10 bankruptcy just like the cities can protect their assets under chapter 9.  Bankruptcy would mean for these states that they could continue to run their affairs as usual with no interference from the bankruptcy court and they would not have to sell any assets.  They could just cancel the debts of all kinds including these pension contracts that were negotiated with the unions.  They could renegotiate new contracts that the states could afford and that were on par with what people earn in the private sector.  Bankruptcy could indeed save the states from disaster and financial ruin.

But there is a price to pay for all of this.  State bond interest rates will have to  increase to reflect the new threat that a state can go bankrupt.  There is currently no such threat as states cannot now go bankrupt so state bonds are given a very good rating.  Since bond investors will now have to risk that the state can go bankrupt and wipe out their investment, the state will have to pay a higher interest rate to attract investors.  Presumably once the law is passed allowing states to go bankrupt then any state can declare bankruptcy as often as the law allows.

I would argue that if the states don’t get this debt problem under control then the bond rates could increase anyway as they would have a greater risk of defaulting on the bonds.  The bond issue can be dealt with so the effect of a bankruptcy on state bonds will be lessened.  Bonds could be given some kind of special preference for instance.  If the states can protect the bond holders position in the bankruptcy or reaffirm (agree to pay) the bond debts then the harm to the bond market could be minimized.  Then states could still find buyers for bonds in the future when they need a new road or bridge or airport.

My advice to the states with the most debt is to strongly consider the bankruptcy option.

I am a San Diego bankruptcy attorney.  Please visit my websites at www.farquharlaw.com or www.freshstartsandiego.com.  Or call me for free with any bankruptcy or debt related question you might have at (619) 702-5015.  Call now for a free credit report and analysis!

For a free e-book: “13 THINGS YOU SHOULD DO TO PREPARE FOR YOUR BANKRUPTCY FILING” please send a request by e-mail to: farquharesq@yahoo.com.

How do I file for bankruptcy? What is the process?

Filing for bankruptcy is easier than you might think.  If you are hiring a bankruptcy attorney to file it for you then he or she should be very familiar with the process.

You will be asked about income, expenses, and assets.  You will need to list all of  your personal and real property.  Most people have a car, a bank account, furniture, clothes and maybe some jewelry.  Others have a house. All of this will be listed along with any loans you have on any property.  Your income will be determined by 6 months of pay stubs of with a profit and loss statement if you have a business.  Your expenses you can list also.

Next comes your debts.   Your attorney will list your debts in the bankruptcy and most can download them from you credit report.  There will be a few questions about when the debt was incurred if they considered high but for the most part your unsecured debts are dischargeable.  If you have student loans, some taxes, or spousal/child support debts then those would not be dischargeable.

The attorney will get more information from you and fill out the rest of the schedules like the statement of financial affairs and he or she will complete the bankruptcy schedules.  You then will sign the documents and most attorneys will file electronically after that.  Most attorneys will take the necessary time to do this but in an emergency the whole process can be done rather quickly.

You will then get a meeting of creditors 30 days after the bankruptcy filing.  There a trustee will ask a few simple questions unless there are more serious issues.  Your attorney will attend this hearing so if you get stuck they are there to help you.  Creditors rarely attend this meeting and if they do then there are only a few questions they can ask.

Sixty days after the hearing you get your discharge if there are no holdups or problems with the case.  You are now debt free and able to move on with your life and a fresh start.   There that wasn’t so bad was it?

I am a bankruptcy attorney in San Diego.  Please visit my website for more help at www.farquharlaw.com.

7 reasons why the timing of your bankruptcy filing is crucial

Over the years I have seen that time and time again the timing of the filing of the bankruptcy is crucial for a debtor to receive the most out of the bankruptcy as he or she possible can.  Your filing discharges all debts before you file.  You can amend and add debts during the bankruptcy but after it’s closed it’s more difficult.

1)  If you are going to incur some unavoidable debt– in the near future you don’t want to file too soon.  You may want to wait until after the debt has been incurred.  Many people have a medical issue like an upcoming operation that is going to occur in the near future.  If that is the case then it is best to wait until that medical procedure is finished and you are billed for it.  Then we can add the debt to the bankruptcy and the debt can be discharged.

So if you have debts that will be incurred in the near future it is a good idea to wait to file so you can include them in the bankruptcy.

 2) If it has been less than 8 years since you file a chapter 7- Then you want to wait until the 8 years elapses before you file again.  If you file too soon the case will be dismissed.  We need to carefully examine when your last filing occurred before we file for you again.

 3) If some creditor has sued you– then you want to be sure to file in around 30 days after the suit was served on you (not 30 days after the suit was filed).  So try to remember when you were served with the suit and you have 30 days from that day to file the bankruptcy before the creditor can default you and begin to attempt to collect on your debt.

 4) If foreclosure has been started then you want to probably get the maximum time to stay in your house.  In this case you want to wait to file until the last possible day before the trustee sale where your house will be sold.  A filing the day before the sale will stop the sale and the creditor will have to file a motion for relief from stay to proceed with the sale.  From my experience this will delay the sale for around two more months on average in a chapter 7.

If you file a chapter 13 you can stop the sale but if you want to keep your house then you would have to have sufficient income to pay for it and in addition you would need disposable income to at least partially pay your unsecured creditors.

 5) If you are currently unemployed or underemployed and you believe that you might get a higher paying job in the future then you might want to file soon.  It is possible that the new job could pay you sufficient income that you would fail the means test and thus lose your ability to file a chapter 7 because you waited.

I have encountered this case a few times and would be a shame to not file quickly here.  To lose a chapter 7 can mean that you would be in a 13 where for up to five years you would be paying debts you could have discharged if you filed sooner.

 6) If you have recently charged some large amount on your credit card then you might want to wait for some time to elapse so that this charge ages.  This also occurs with cash advances.  Both can invite a fraud challenge from a credit card company if the charges are too large and too soon before the bankruptcy filing.

Here I like to look at the charges and see when they were made, for how much, for what purpose, and how recently.  I analyze the risk of filing on a case by case basis.

 7) If you just want to get started re-building your credit then you would want to push the bankruptcy forward and file right away.

For more info. check out my websites at:   www.farquharlaw.com or www.freshstartsandiego.com.

I am a bankruptcy lawyer in San Diego.

For a free e-book: “13 THINGS YOU SHOULD DO TO PREPARE FOR YOUR BANKRUPTCY FILING” please send a request by e-mail to: farquharesq@yahoo.com.