Do you have some special possession you want to keep in bankruptcy? Because you probably can.

corvetteIs there some special heirloom you have or a piece of furniture you like or do you have an old car that you just can’t lose?  Maybe you own an old jewelryclassic ’57 Chevy or Corvette that you want to fix up someday.  You may have a great number of debts which you realize you can’t afford to pay but you are worried about the safety of your favorite possessions if you do file for bankruptcy.

The good news is that you probably can keep these possessions as long as the property’s value is less than the exemptions allowed in bankruptcy.  In bankruptcy law there are very liberal exemptions and these exemptions are what allow you to keep property after the bankruptcy is over.

One very helpful exemption is something called the “wildcard” exemption that you can use to protect any kind of property that you own.  At the time of this writing the wildcard exemption is $26,425.00 and that is pretty generous.

There are other exemptions besides the wildcard.  There is one for your car, and one for your furniture, clothes, and household items.  There are separate exemptions for cars, jewelry, and tools of the trade and don’t worry about you retirement account because that is almost certainly exempt.  Your attorney can advise you about all of the applicable exemptions in your state.

Your property will fit within the wildcard exemption as long as your property is worth less than $26,425.00.  If it does then you can keep it.  To value the property you want to go to a website like Kelly Blue Book for cars or you can go to Ebay or even Craig’s list to see what items similar to yours are selling for.

To get a more accurate valuation of the property you can hire an estimator or property appraiser who, if you pay him, will give you his or her valuation of the property.  If the property is of a special nature like a record collection then a property estimator who owns a record store could do the valuation.  The same thing applies for jewelry or a stamp collection, or an old gun from the civil war (jewelry even has its own separate exemption).  There is usually someone out there who can accurately value your property whatever the type.

valueRemember the bankruptcy trustee can only take your property if it has a value beyond your exemptions.  This is why it is so important to establish the fair market value of the item(s).  So if you (and your bankruptcy attorney) show the trustee that the fair market value is less than the exemption amount that you claim then you will usually be okay.

It is possible that the trustee can get his own valuation which could be higher than yours but if you get a reliable appraiser for the property you can usually defend your appraisal.  It is always good to consult with a bankruptcy attorney if you have any questions about whether you can keep your property in bankruptcy and if you should or should not file bankruptcy.

I am a San Diego bankruptcy attorney.  For further questions please visit my websites at www.farquharlaw.com or www.freshstartsandiego.com.  Or call my office for a free consultation or for any other advice about bankruptcy or debt at (619) 702-5015. Call now for free credit report and analysis!

For a free e-book on “13 things to do to prepare for your bankruptcy filing” please e-mail me at farquharesq@yahoo.com.

Corvette by Zombieite.  Jewelry photo courtesy of Gnilenkov Aleksey.

Do I have to give up everything I own to file bankruptcy? No!

property 2I am asked this question probably once a week.  Many people believe that they must lose everything they own to file for a bankruptcy.  This is not true.  I believe that this comes from some of the guilt and shame that people feel when they file.  They believe that they are doing something almost dishonest.  They believe that they must “honor” their debts.  The collection agencies that attempt to collect on these debts will encourage these feelings of guilt to dissuade people from filing for bankruptcy and to get people to pay them.

Many of my clients also believe that they have somehow failed when they file for bankruptcy and failure is just not accepted in this country.  They then try for years to pay debts that they cannot afford thinking that they will then not be failures.  I usually remind them that many successful companies have filed for bankruptcy over the years and individuals have the same right to do so.  In fact the filing of bankruptcy can get rid of debt and put an individual on the road to success.

The reality is that bankruptcy is a legal and moral solution to your debt problems and you can keep most of your property in the bankruptcy.  This is because there are very generous bankruptcy exemptions.  These exemptions allow you to keep a lot of stuff.  Your retirement funds can be kept with one exemption, your car with another, a certain amount of jewelry with another, and even “tools of the trade” if you own a business or use those tools in your line of work.

In addition there are homestead exemptions for equity in your house and the contents in your house, like our personal belongings and your clothes, can usually all be exempted.  Anything that exceeds these exemptions can be put into the $23,000 “wildcard” exemption which can be used for cash, stock, bonds, or anything else.

Insurance and social security money and your current income are also exempt so call a bankruptcy attorney if you need a bankruptcy and get a consultation about your property.  Most likely you can keep it.

I am a San Diego bankruptcy attorney.  For further questions please visit my websites at www.farquharlaw.com or www.freshstartsandiego.com.  Or call my office for a free consultation or for any other advice about bankruptcy or debt at (619) 702-5015. Call now for free credit report and analysis!

For a free e-book on “13 things to do to prepare for your bankruptcy filing” please e-mail me at farquharesq@yahoo.com.

Photo courtesy of Alan Cleaver

Be aware of the bankruptcy warning signs in your own life!

warningThere are many warning signs that can appear in person’s financial life that can signal that a person is insolvent and in need of warning 4declaring bankruptcy.  If you can recognize these signs then it is possible for you to prepare to file for bankruptcy.  A timely bankruptcy filing can avoid the pitfalls of irreversible financial mistakes.  I often discover that my clients have made these mistakes prior to coming to see me.

I wanted to warn people in this blog so they could consider bankruptcy when the financial danger first appears so they can avoid the mistakes that come with the failure to recognize the warning signs of an impending bankruptcy.  If these signs appear you may be in a situation where bankruptcy makes more sense than continuing with a charade or outright lie that you are “someday” going to pay your debts.

Many people continue with this denial for years and years and some make many financial mistakes because of it.  Some will cash in their retirement funds or sell other property to raise cash in an attempt to pay down their debts.   Retirement funds and many other types of property are exempt in bankruptcy.  It is always a mistake to cash in retirement funds or many other types of property that are exempt in a bankruptcy.   You can keep these assets in a bankruptcy and still get rid of your debts.

Some people will struggle along for long periods paying partial payments to creditors which will often cover only interest on their debts.   This only results in them their spending endless amounts of money which could have been saved had they only admitted to themselves that bankruptcy made sense.  Some will even borrow some money from friends and relatives in an attempt to pay down the debt.  This money is completely wasted and probably lost forever if these people eventually do file a bankruptcy.

1) The first warning sign is when you are paying interest only on credit card or other debts.  If you cannot pay down the debt itself but you are paying interest only then that is a sign of trouble ahead.  Interest rates will rise and just like our government you will eventually reach a point where your interest on your debts takes up a huge share of your income so that you cannot cover your basic monthly expenses for living.   This is an unsustainable situation and one which signals that bankruptcy make s a lot of sense for you.

2) Unemployment or underemployment.  If you have debts that you could afford to pay on when you high paying job but then you lose that job (or you get a job which pays far less) then you may be headed for bankruptcy.  Some will believe that they can magically still pay these debts even though they now need their now reduced income to continue to pay their monthly expenses.

3) When your expenses exceed your income each month before you pay your debts.  If you have no money left over after you pay your current monthly bills to pay past debt payments then it is probably time to consider bankruptcy.

4)  If you have had a vehicle repossessed and you have been hit with a large deficiency balance because of it then you may need a bankruptcy.  Some of my clients have multiple cars repossessed and they thus have multiple deficiency balances that can add up to tens of thousands of dollars.  If they cannot afford to keep up with payments on the vehicles prior to repossession then they will probably not have enough income to pay off the deficiency balance on the old car and somehow secure a new car to drive.

5) Another sign is if you suffered some outrageously high medical debt that is unpayable.  Many of my clients are uninsured or underinsured.  This works for some unless there is a need for an expensive medical procedure.  It is not long before the collectors are calling you to pay tens or even hundreds of thousands of dollars in medical bills.  They will demand that you repay just like any collector and you may not have the income to do it.

6) Then there is the constant steady unabated calls from creditors that you cannot pay so you do not answer your phone.  And this leads me to the all important  psychological  effects of long-term debt upon people.  The constant harassing calls and the knowledge that there is a debt out there that you have no way of paying is a tremendous psychological burden to people.  Bankruptcy lifts this burden, eliminates the debt and the terrible unending stress that goes with it.

7) Some people have multiple court judgments against them for unpaid bills.  These judgments could be for credit cards, deficiency judgments, unpaid medical bills, or debts of any kind for which a creditor has sued you and obtained a court judgment against you.  That creditor can now garnish your wages, seize your property, or demand you come into court for a debtor’s exam.  These “exams” will allow creditors to pry into your finances no matter how much you wish to keep them private.  These are to be avoided at all costs.

8) You may already have garnishments taking 25% of your income.  You now are operating with a reduced income and each creditor is standing in line to get his 25%.  You could pay this virtually forever if you owe enough money to creditors.  Bankruptcy will stop the garnishments, return your income level to what it should be, and banish the debts forever.

All of these are signs that bankruptcy probably would make sense for you and you should get some advice from a bankruptcy attorney.  If you have several of these warning signs (and even if you have only one) then bankruptcy is an option to consider.  There is a little bit of a miracle in bankruptcy.  It can wipe out your debts and free you from your debt burdens.  It is the only way I know of but we don’t need another because it works so well.  So think about if you have any of these signs and if you do then consider bankruptcy.

I am a San Diego bankruptcy attorney.  For further questions please visit my websites at www.farquharlaw.com or www.freshstartsandiego.com.  Or call my office for a free consultation or for any other advice about bankruptcy or debt at (619) 702-5015. Call now for free credit report and analysis!

For a free e-book on “13 things to do to prepare for your bankruptcy filing” please e-mail me at farquharesq@yahoo.com.

Warning sign courtesy of Free Grunge Textures.  Danger sign courtesy of Atomicjeep.

What is community property and how does it affect my bankrupty?

property 3Community property is, in short, the property you and your spouse acquired while you were married.  It includes any real estate and property 5personal property that you bought while you were married.  So cars, clothes, jewelry, furniture are all considered community property if they were acquired while you were married.  Real estate acquired during the marriage is considered community property in the same way.

It gets a little more complicated when you have a piece of real estate that was yours alone prior to the marriage.  If you get married after you bought the property your new spouse can gain (over time) a community interest in your real estate.

Real estate requires the regular and continuous paying of fees for maintenance, taxes, and even the mortgage payment.  Even if you continue to pay these yourself (with no contribution from your new spouse) your spouse is getting a growing community interest as you make those maintenance payments.

The money you use to pay these ongoing property expenses are community funds even if the funds come from income you earn alone.  This is because every dollar you earn during your marriage is half owned by your spouse.  This works both ways as every dollar your spouse earns is half yours too.  Therefore if you are married and the only one working and you pay these expenses out of your income alone on property that was yours before the marriage, your spouse is still getting a gradual community interest.

So when it comes time to file bankruptcy the trustee will want to know if you are married.  If you are then community property issues arise and he will ask questions about any property you or your spouse own individually or together.  If your spouse files bankruptcy and you do not your spouse may have a community interest in your real estate.  This will be true even if your spouse did nothing to and for the property.

These issues can get complicated so you need an attorney to analyze your property and your spouse’s to see if there are any community property issues.  Property can and will be seized and sold by a trustee if there is any value owned by the person filing bankruptcy if that value is not properly exempted.

Community property does not include property that you alone inherited and that you have kept segregated and separated from your spouse’s property.  If you have not commingled that property with your spouse then that property can be considered separate and not community for bankruptcy and other purposes.

But if you inherited real estate it may have started out as separate property but it may lose its separate property nature over time.  Again as you pay on it you may be giving your spouse a community interest even in separate property that was inherited by you.

There are other issues related to community property such as whether you gifted property to a spouse by putting the title it in their name.  If you do put a spouse on title then there is a presumption of gift and depending upon how title is held that property will probably be considered half owned by the spouse.  It would then lose its separate property status.

I am a San Diego bankruptcy attorney.  For further questions please visit my websites at www.farquharlaw.com or www.freshstartsandiego.com.  Or call my office for a free consultation or for any other advice about bankruptcy or debt at (619) 702-5015.  Call now for free credit report and analysis!

For a free e-book on “13 things to do to prepare for your bankruptcy filing” please e-mail me at farquharesq@yahoo.com.

 

Private property photo courtesy of hworks.  House photo courtesy of danzoO8.

What is a “cramdown” in bankruptcy?

Bankruptcy is filled with interesting terms like the “cram-down”.  A cram-down is just where property that is encumbered with a loan is restructured in a chapter 13 bankruptcy so that the debtor only has to pay the loan to the extent of the property’s worth.  A cramdown can also be done in a chapter 11 bankruptcy.

A cramdown can be a very helpful and powerful tool in a bankruptcy if a debtor has property that he wants to keep but is upside down (meaning he owes more on it than it is worth).  With a cram-down a debtor can strip away the part of the loan that is unsecured and pay the secured part in the 5 year chapter 13 bankruptcy period.  The unsecured part is the upside down portion.  So if you have a car worth $10,000 but it has a $15,000 loan on it then the cramdown would strip off the $5000 unsecured portion of the loan and let you pay the $10,000 secured portion.

The loan is actually bifurcated or divided into two parts in a chapter 13 cramdown.  The secured part is paid in the plan.  The unsecured part drops in with the general unsecured debts.  These debts are paid only to the extent that any unsecureds are paid.  Sometimes it can be very low like 10% or 20%.  The rest (80% to 90%) is discharged at the end of 5 years.  The creditor is thus forced to “eat” the rest of his loan and the debtor does not pay it.

Keep in mind that this is usually done in a chapter 13 bankruptcy.  A chapter 13 is a pay back plan where debts are paid out over 3 to 5 years.  In the chapter 13 the unsecured portion of the loan will be paid out of disposable income by the debtor.

Disposable income is the amount the debtor has left after he pays his bills.  This can be as little as a few hundred dollars a month that goes to pay unsecureds.  This same cramdown tactic can be used for furniture, jewelry or any other personal property.

There are special rules for car cramdowns though.  You must have owned the car for 910 days (2 and one half years) before you are eligible for the cramdown.  For other personal property it is only one year.

Real estate can be crammed down too in a chapter 13.  If you have a piece of real property that is an investment property and not your residence then it too can be crammed down in a chapter 13.  If a property is worth $200,000 but has $350,000 mortgage on it then the $200,000 can be paid in the plan and the $150,00 can be paid at the low rate along with the other unsecureds.

The $150,000 then would be essentially stripped off and would go away if a workable plan is proposed and is paid on over the five-year period.  This is obviously a tremendous advantage to the debtor and a great disadvantage to the creditor.  But remember too with real estate the secured portion ($200,000 in the above example) must be paid over the 5 year period just like with a car or other personal property.  This is of of course difficult for most debtors as the monthly payments would be very high.

Cramdowns are also available in a chapter 11 just like in a chapter 13 upon approval of the reorganization plan by the court and the creditors.

I am a San Diego bankruptcy attorney.  For further questions please visit my websites at www.farquharlaw.com or www.freshstartsandiego.com.  Or call my office for a free consultation or for any other advice about bankruptcy or debt at (619) 702-5015.  Call now for free credit report and analysis!  For a free e-book on “13 things to do to prepare for your bankruptcy filing” please e-mail me at farquharesq@yahoo.com.

What is a fraudulent transfer? Did I do something wrong?

I know that fraud sounds bad and fraudulent transfer sounds even worse.  But his term is often used in and out of bankruptcy.  (Sometimes it is referred to as a fraudulent conveyance).  In your bankruptcy you may have gotten a notice that you are being accused of a fraudulent transfer by the bankruptcy trustee.  Fraudulent transfer rules come from section 548 of the bankruptcy code.  But don’t worry, this can be addressed in the bankruptcy and it does not mean that you are guilty of any crime or even that you are a bad person.

This is because they are not (usually) talking about you committing an actual, intentional fraud where you decided to de-fraud someone of their money or property.  They are instead talking about a “constructive fraud” which is one where there is a law against doing these trnasfers but intent to do fraud is not there.  Fraudulent intent is inferred from your actions.

The fraudulent transfer label is used most often when an asset/property has been transferred to someone else under circumstances that look suspicious. This could be real estate or personal property like a car or a piece of jewelry. In the bankruptcy context it occurs when you transfer an asset to someone else, you receive little or nothing in return, and you are insolvent at the time.

You may have had no bad intent at the time you transferred the asset so don’t worry.  You may not even have thought that it was wrong.  I have had clients transfer all kinds of things for many different reasons.  You will need to disclose the transfer to your bankruptcy attorney and describe the circumstances surrounding the transfer any time you have transferred property before a bankruptcy.

And the look back period varies in different states but in California it is four years.  So any property transferred to someone else in the last 4 years for less than its full value needs to be reported in the bankruptcy.  Especially if that transfer leaves you insolvent which means that your liabilities are greater than your assets.  This would not include a property sale to an outside buyer, especially to a buyer who pays full value.  There is a much shorter “look back” period for these transfers and they are usually not questioned by the trustee.

The purpose of the fraudulent transfer rules in bankruptcy is to prevent people from moving assets out of their estate and then going bankrupt on the debts.  Everyone would give their property to family members if they could and then get rid of their debts.  After the case was concluded then they could take the assets back.  This would not be fair to creditors and is not allowed so report these transfers to your attorney in a bankruptcy.

If you received a notification of a fraudulent transfer in a bankruptcy then the trustee could file or possibly has already filed what is called an adversary proceeding.  An adversary proceeding is a complaint filed within a bankruptcy case that is objecting to some aspect of the case.  A trustee will file one if there is a suspected fraudulent transfer of an asset.  He will want to bring this asset back into the estate to sell it for the benefit of the creditors.  (See here for more on adversary proceedings).

The problem here is that the trustee will seek to recover the asset from the person who received it.  If the transferred asset has gone to your relative or friend then they would be drawn into the case so that the trustee could take the asset from that person.  This person, the recipient of the asset, is not going to be too thrilled about this so this is a fairly serious problem.

As with all adversary proceedings this complaint must be answered.  Even if no adversary has been filed you still need to contact an attorney to deal with this issue.  Sometimes a settlement can be worked out but often the proper procedures must be followed timely or a judgment can occur for the entire asset.  If this is a piece of real estate or and expensive piece of jewelry then this can mean a great loss of money if a settlement could have been worked out.

I am bankruptcy attorney in San Diego who handles adversary proceedings for both settlement and trial.  Please visit my websites at www.farquharlaw.com or www.freshstartsandiego.com for more info. about any of these topics.  Or call my office for a free consultation at (619) 702-5015.  Call now for free credit report and analysis!

For a free e-book: “13 THINGS YOU SHOULD DO TO PREPARE FOR YOUR BANKRUPTCY FILING” please send a request by e-mail to: farquharesq@yahoo.com.

Bankruptcy Good News! Because of bankruptcy exemptions you can usually keep all of your possessions after filing for bankruptcy!

Most people are afraid to file bankruptcy because they wrongly believe that they will have to surrender some or all of their possessions once they go bankrupt.  This is not true and has not been true for hundreds of years.  You will usually not have to surrender any possessions after filing bankruptcy in the vast majority of cases.  This is all because of the magic of bankruptcy exemptions and these exemptions have an interesting history.

When you file for bankruptcy a bankruptcy estate is automatically created which includes all of a debtor’s possessions.  These possessions could be sold by a bankruptcy trustee if it were not for the magical exemptions.  Exemptions allow debtors to take their property outside of the bankruptcy estate and keep it for themselves.  A Trustee cannot touch any properly exempted property.  This is what makes bankruptcy so attractive to you when your debt load gets excessively high.

Long ago it was true in England that a debtor had to give up all of his possessions to file for bankruptcy.  This included literally the shirt on his back.  In those days bankruptcy laws required a debtor to turn over all of his clothes to his creditors.  This resulted in public breaches of the peace.  A judge in old England responded with the very first bankruptcy exemption.

This was an exemption for the debtor’s one suit of clothes.  It allowed the debtor to keep his clothes so he would not be forced to break the public nudity laws.  Judges could simply not allow a situation where a person exercised their legal right to file for bankruptcy but in doing so were forced to break another law which was the law against public nudity.

That old decision started the ball rolling and bankruptcy exemptions have been expanding ever since.  Cooking implements were added and then furniture.  Homes were later included in exemptions so people could have a place to live and not forced to be homeless by bankruptcy.  Vehicles were added so debtors could get to work as were tools of the trade,  jewelry, as well as a few others.  In addition to these exemptions at some point in America we added a blanket “wild card” exemption into which a debtor can fit property of any kind.

Currently this wild card exemption is over $23,000.  In it you can protect cash, stocks, bonds, jewelry, collectibles, or any kind of property you see fit.  This is a very generous exemption and it is why most people can keep most of their property in a bankruptcy.  Most of my clients historically do not have assets in excess of this amount and therefore they can file bankruptcy and get rid of most of their debts and they can usually keep all of their assets.

So that is good news for you if you are considering filing for bankruptcy.  Don’t worry about your property.  Just contact a bankruptcy lawyer before you file to get your property properly exempted and you can move on debt free after your bankruptcy discharges.

I am a San Diego bankruptcy attorney.  Please visit my website for more information at www.farquharlaw.com or www.freshstartsandiego.com.  Or call my office for a free consultation at (619) 702-5015.

For a free e-book: “13 THINGS YOU SHOULD DO TO PREPARE FOR YOUR BANKRUPTCY FILING” please send a request by e-mail to: farquharesq@yahoo.com.

Good News! You cannot be imprisoned in California for owing debts! It’s in the California Constitution!

Check out my blog update on this subject here http://bit.ly/I2qMO2 .

I was looking at the articles of the constitution of California today to see if they have a free speech code.  Los Angeles is about to pass a speech limitation ordinance that should be struck down if there is such a code in the state constitution and there is such a free speech provision.  While I was reading the articles of the California constitution I noticed something else.  In Article 1 Section 10 it states that “A person may not be imprisoned in a civil action for debt or tort, …”.

This clause appears to be one that would outlaw the practice of imprisoning debtors for debts to creditors that is happening in other states.  The Wall Street Journal and other publications have written articles detailing how in some states in the mid-west judges are actually imprisoning debtors for owing money to creditors even though such practice has been outlawed since the 1800s, 140 years ago.  Nobody is sure how this debtor’s prison has returned after so much time but possibly it reflects the power and influence of these creditors that we attorneys have been warning people about for some time.

In some cases defendants were arrested at their homes, handcuffed in front of their families, and taken off to a night spent in a lonely, damp, cold jail.  Some were not told until the next morning why they were arrested and most had long forgotten about the private monetary debt that had put them there in that jail.  Each was extremely disturbed and shaken by the experience and each was taking some time to recover.

Imagine the indignity and horror to live a law abiding life and then to suddenly find oneself in jail shivering when the laws that put you there were banned over 100 years ago.  It really boggles the mind that this is happening but it is in some states.  You can read my other blogs about debtors prison here:  http://bit.ly/JmsMFt ,  and here:  http://bit.ly/HPAMsQ .

I was happy therefore to read this section in the California constitution that bans such a practice.  If the creditors ever try to imprison someone here for owing money to a creditor then an attorney can use this provision to get the victim out of jail.  I have never heard of people being jailed for monetary debts in this state but that does not mean that it won’t happen in the future and i is possible that it has happened and the facts have not been widely circulated.

Whatever the case it seems that Californians are protected form debtor’s prison by their constitution.  If you have debts you cannot pay though don’t take the chance of having a lawsuit filed against you and the creditors taking you income or property away from you.  Contact a good bankruptcy or debt attorney t see what you options are to deal with that debt so that it won’t continue to create problems for you.

I am a bankruptcy attorney practicing bankruptcy law in San Diego.  Please visit my website at www.farquharlaw.com or www.freshstartsandiego.com.  Or call my office for a free consultation at (619) 702-5015.  Call now for free credit report and analysis!  For a free e-book: “13 THINGS YOU SHOULD DO TO PREPARE FOR YOUR BANKRUPTCY FILING” please send a request by e-mail to: farquharesq@yahoo.com.

Cash for keys! It’s still available after a foreclosure. My advice is get that cash!

(For the current state of the foreclosure crisis see this blog: http://bit.ly/JGU1dZ ).

How many times does someone hand you cash?  I’m sure it’s not often but it is the case that lenders are offering cash for keys after a foreclosure.  You may or may not be upset about the foreclosure and you may actually be relieved that the process is all over.  You may have tried a short sale that failed (or you may have never attempted one) and now the foreclosure sale has taken place and you are being contacted by the new owner of your property to find out from you what your plans are.

Remember that this new owner will have to evict you legally before he can get you out of this house that you formerly owned even though he is the new legal owner of the property.  He cannot throw you into the street.  There is no “self-help” allowed and the only way a new owner can get you out of your former home is through the eviction process.  You are no squatter.  You originally entered the property legally.   You are the former owner with the legal right to be there until a judge evicts you in court.

In California eviction means that the landlord has to give you a 3 day notice, followed by a filing of an unlawful detainer action, followed by a trial, followed by a sheriff who will actually remove you.  This all takes time and money.  To get you out will take around 4 to 6 weeks depending on how behind the courts and the sheriffs are.  In addition he has to hire attorneys, pay filing fees, and wait until the process finishes.

Or he can pay you money.  The going rate is about $3000 so don’t sell cheap.  Many of my clients have been offered and have received this money.  It will cost the landlord almost that much to proceed with and eviction plus there is the time involved.  The landlord may ask you to leave quickly (like in a week) but you can always try to negotiate for more time.  Just don’t scare him off so he doesn’t pay you.  Remember though that he will know the costs of legally removing you and that is your leverage.

You have a legal right to be in this home until he goes through the lengthy and costly legal process of removing you.  You can remind him of that if it helps the negotiations but always remember that you have legal rights.  If you don’t exercise them you will lose them.  You will be saving him time and money if you get out quickly with no hassles for $3000.

An extra $3000 can help a lot with bills and getting a new place.  If you can get more time then do so but if not then I suggest you take the money.

If you need a bankruptcy now to get rid of credit card or automobile deficiency or medical debt then call me and we will discuss how to free you up from the rest of your debt.

I am a San Diego bankruptcy attorney.  Please visit my website for more information at www.farquharlaw.com or www.freshstartsandiego.com.  Or call my office for a free consultation at (619) 702-5015.  Call now for free credit report and analysis!  If you or someone you know may need to file a bankruptcy get my FREE E-BOOK: “13 THINGS YOU SHOULD DO TO PREPARE FOR OUR BANKRUPTCY FILING” by e-mailing me at: farquharesq@yahoo.com.

Do I need an attorney to file for bankruptcy?

The short answer is yes!  Don’t try to file a bankruptcy without one!

Your attorney will know the law first and foremost.  The attorney will know if you have too much property or income for instance as he will do a means test calculation for you as is required by the law.  I recently came in on a bankruptcy case where a bankruptcy filer should never have filed a case because this person had non-exempt income or assets.

The trustee just claimed all of those assets for the creditors as they will do when there are assets available to seize.  If an experienced bankruptcy attorney would have been consulted in the beginning then they could have advised the client not to file for bankruptcy at all in that case.

The client could have saved the filing fee, attorney’s fees, administrative fees and they could have worked out a deal to pay the debts back.  As it turned out the client had to surrender assets necessary to pay all of these costs and he had to pay the debts back in full.  It would have been much cheaper not to file bankruptcy in the first place and to make matters worse the clients assets were tied up for over a year.

Secondly you need an attorney because the attorney will know the bankruptcy procedures.  Filing for bankruptcy requires many procedural steps which are difficult for the novice to comply with.  An attorney will file the case electronically with special bankruptcy software that automatically complies with the procedural requirements of the court.  I have seen many filers in 341 hearings who didn’t know what they were doing so they made serious errors.  These errors usually result in delays and continuances and sometimes in dismissals of the bankruptcy case.

If the case is dismissed then the debts come back into play and the whole reason for filing is negated.  Now you have lost the filing fee and you will suffer other penalties like losing the automatic stay for a year.

Thirdly you need an attorney because if you hire one you should get an expert who knows the law,and  the procedure but also someone who knows the trustees.  Each bankruptcy trustee is a little different and each has slightly different requirements.  An experienced attorney will know what each one needs and what each one likes to receive in terms of supporting documentation.  This will inevitably help you through the process in the smoothest and quickest fashion.

Lastly with an attorney you get someone to accompany you through the process.  I accompany all of my clients to the 341 meeting of creditors and I am available for any questions that they might have about the process at any time.  This helps people to have fewer fears and worries about something that people naturally are very scared about.

So there are many reasons to hire an experienced bankruptcy attorney to help with your bankruptcy.  Remember too that the attorney is the only one that can represent you in court in the unlikely event that things go badly.  So if you are considering bankruptcy then hire an attorney and don’t do it yourself!

I practice bankruptcy law in San Diego California.  Please visit my website for more information on filing bankruptcy at: www.farquharlaw.com.