Man Arrested by U.S. Marshals For Outstanding Student Loan of $1,500

6227036996_77501c3a14_bA man was arrested recently in his Houston home by U.S. Marshalls for failure to completely pay the government for a small amount owed on a student loan.  Most student loans are backed by the U.S. government so when you don’t pay them you apparently now get to see the U.S. Marshalls at your door with guns drawn.  You don’t need to owe the U.S. government very much.  The man in question only owed $1500.

Paul Aker of Houston came outside slowly with his hands up and he was arrested by the marshals who had surrounded his home.  He said he did not have any idea why he was being arrested until he was in the car on his way to jail where the marshals revealed that he had an outstanding student loan debt.

Mr. Aker had actually paid off two student loans in the past and he believed he did not owe any more to the government.  The arresting agents asked him if he was in the habit of stealing from the U.S. government.

The U.S. Marshalls did release a statement explaining that it is their duty to serve federal process and to make arrests and they had apparently contacted Mr. Akers by phone to get him to appear in court and he refused.  It would have been a good idea for him to go to court before this unfortunate incident because he was forced to pay the government back for the cost of his arrest ($1258.60) in addition to the delinquent loan with interest.

They did “allow” him to pay off the debt in $200 monthly installments but I would ask what happens if he stops paying the monthly amount?  Do more armed agents show up at his door and arrest him again?  Most of my clients can’t afford such monthly installments and therefore they don’t continue to pay them.  Indeed in chapter 13 bankruptcies most debtors fall out of their chapter 13 plans for failure to pay.

I have written in the past about people being arrested and sent to debtor’s prison for unpaid debts but that is rare in America and it is not done at all in most states.  Debtor’s prisons were supposed to be completely outlawed in the 1800s.  The federal government appears to be the worst creditor of all to owe as their full military and police power can be turned against a person for some small student loan as we see here.  For many years similar heavy handed tactics have been reported to have been used by the IRS for unpaid back taxes.  With a private non-student debt you would not see anything like this.

Unfortunately there is not much bankruptcy can do for people with student loan debts.  Currently student loans cannot be discharged in bankruptcy (unless there is “extreme hardship”) though we attorneys are hoping that someday that law will be changed to allow people to escape these debts if they cannot pay them.  In America there is something like $1.2 trillion owed in student debts and no politician has yet done anything about it.

In the mean time I think it is a good idea to avoid these student loans wherever possible.  They last forever, they cannot be discharged in bankruptcy, and someday a tragedy could occur when an overzealous marshal pulls a trigger and possibly ends a person’s life for a few delinquent student loan dollars.

For those that already have the loans I would suggest you stay in continual contact with some representative of the government to work out whatever deal you can with them just like you would with the IRS.  If you do not you might have the misfortune of seeing armed federal agents surrounding your house who will place you under arrest and make you appear before a federal judge.  Let’s hope that someday the law will be changed and student loans will become dischargeable in bankruptcy even if the student debt has to be 10 or 20 years old before it is eligible for discharge.

Photo by a.mina from Flickr

 

I am a San Diego bankruptcy attorney.  For further questions please visit my websites at www.farquharlaw.com or www.freshstartsandiego.com.  Or call my office for a free consultation or for any other advice about bankruptcy or debt at (619) 702-5015. Call now for free credit report and analysis!

For a free e-book on “13 things to do to prepare for your bankruptcy filing” please e-mail me at farquharesq@yahoo.com.

 

What do I do if I get a 1099-C from a creditor for “forgiveness of debt tax”?

Don’t worry if you get a 1099-c from a creditor.  Study up on the issue and then consult a tax counselor for more advice.  Most tax advisors know all about 1099-c and its tax consequences.

Any debt forgiveness can result in taxable income in the eyes of the IRS.  The IRS considers forgiven debt to be income to you that is taxable.  This is true even though it is “phantom income” that you will never see.

Forgiveness of debt income can be on a settled credit card but more often it is concerning a mortgaged home that was foreclosed on or short sold.  Sometimes it is called “cancellation of debt income” or COD.  This can result in tremendous taxes owed by you to the IRS.

The good news is that if you short sold your home or had it foreclosed on you will be allowed to exclude up to $2 million in debt forgiveness with the Mortgage Forgiveness Debt Relief Act of 2007.  This law allows exclusion of this excluded debt from taxable income through 2012 unless Congress acts to extend it.  This act was passed during the home foreclosure crisis to give relief for homeowners who have had to abandon their homes.

The debt you incurred (and which was forgiven by the bank) must be to buy, build, or substantially improve your principal residence.  So business property, second homes, investment property, rental are all not covered by the Mortgage Forgiveness Act.

There are other ways to get out of this potential COD income though.  The most notable is bankruptcy.  If you file for bankruptcy then insolvency is presumed and you just file the IRS form 982.  Your accountant or tax preparer can help you with this.  This form has boxes you check and if you filed bankruptcy or were insolvent when the debt forgiveness or cancellation occurred then you check the box and file the form with your taxes.

So ask your accountant or tax advisor about form 982 if you received a 1099-c or if you are worried about the tax implications of a short sale or foreclosure on your home.  Remember that there is a law out there that helps you.  If you get one after 2012 and Congress lets the law expire then remember that there is bankruptcy or insolvency that will exclude the amounts of debt forgiven from your income and you therefore won’t owe any tax on it.

I am a San Diego bankruptcy attorney.  For further questions please visit my websites at www.farquharlaw.com or www.freshstartsandiego.com.  Or call my office for a free consultation or for any other advice about bankruptcy or debt at (619) 702-5015.  Call now for free credit report and analysis!   For a free e-book on “13 things to do to prepare for your bankruptcy filing” please e-mail me at farquharesq@yahoo.com.

Can I get rid of my tax debt in bankruptcy?

The answer is, it depends.  It depends upon what kind of taxes you are attempting to discharge in bankruptcy but if you mean income taxes then yes you can discharge them in bankruptcy.  Income tax dischargeability in bankruptcy is determined to just a few rules.

3 year rule

Taxes are dichargeable 3 years after they were due if there were no extensions..  If the taxes were due for the 2008 tax year in April of 2009 they would be dischargeable 3 years later after April 15th of 2012.  If you received an extension until October 2008 then they would be dischargeable in October 2012.

2 year rule

Taxes are dischargeable two years after the return was actually filed.  So 2008 taxes filed in April of 2009 would be dischargeable in April of 2011.

240 day rule

If you had income taxes assessed by the IRS the 240 day rule applies.  These taxes are dischargeable 240 days or 8 months after they were first assessed by the IRS.  Assessments often come after an audit of your taxes or if the IRS denies one of your deductions and then assesses you a greater tax.  If you wait until 8 months after these taxes are first assessed then they are also dischargeable in bankruptcy.

Other taxes

Most people have state or federal types of taxe issues but there are other cases.  If you owe sales taxes,  payroll taxes or withholding tax for employees for instance then those taxes are not dischargeable.  The IRS (or California State Franchise Board in California) consider these non-dischargeable because they were supposed to be withheld by the employer.  Many businesses rn into this kind of tax and it cannot be discharged in bankruptcy unfortunately.

Tax Fraud

If your tax return was made fraudulently or made to willfully evade taxes then those taxes would be deemed non-dischargeable in bankruptcy according to section 523 of the bankruptcy code.  This code section covers all of the exceptions to discharge.

Tax liens

If a tax lien was filed against you for failure to pay the tax then that lien does not get wiped out in the bankruptcy.  It remains after the bankruptcy.  So for example if the IRS put a tax lien on your house then it would not be extinguished by your chapter 7 bankruptcy.

You also need to be sure also that what you owe to the government is a tax.  If it is considered a “fine, fee, or penalty or forfeiture payable to and for the benefit of a governmental unit” then it is not dischargeable.  This is from section 523(a)(6) and this section is referring to things  like traffic tickets, parking tickets, court imposed penalties and fees.  Just make sure your tax is a tax and not one of these fines or penalties.

So most of your income taxes are dischargeable if they are old enough.  Have your attorney look at them careful to make sure they are.  You can always wait to file until they age if need be.

I am a San Diego bankruptcy attorney.  For further questions please visit my websites at www.farquharlaw.com or www.freshstartsandiego.com.  Or call my office for a free consultation or for any other advice about bankruptcy or debt at (619) 702-5015.  Call now for free credit report and analysis!  For a free e-book on “13 things to do to prepare for your bankruptcy filing” please e-mail me at farquharesq@yahoo.com.

“Occupy Chicago” wants to forgive student loans. Your student loan bailout should be through bankruptcy!

The “Occupy Wall Street” movement has created many spinoff movements all over the country like the one here in San Diego.  After hearing criticism for their lack of coherent demands, the “Occupy Chicago” chapter came out with a list of demands on Monday.  Among other things, like taxing the wealthy and attacking Wall Street, they want student loans forgiven.  I argued in a blog that I posted Sunday on the Occupy San Diego movement that student loans should be dischargeable in bankruptcy.

In the face of the bailouts that Wall Street firms and banks received more and more people are asking “where is our bailout”?  Regular people have a tremendous amount of debt which they cannot afford and they believe that justice demands that they need some consideration from government.  It is true that almost 50% of people pay no income taxes but should we bailout the 99% with massive wealth transfers?

I say no.   Most people in this country will not go for that.  I have argued for years on my blog that a bailout plan already exists for the 99% of us that are neither rich nor giant corporations.  It’s called bankruptcy and bankruptcy allows you to legally walk away from your debts and have them discharged so you no longer owe them.  You can then get a fresh start debt free and keep what money you earn from employment.  Everyone can avail themselves of bankruptcy.  You don’t have to be a privileged person or corporation to get it.  In fact if you make too much money you will be means tested out of a chapter 7.

So bankruptcy is available for regular people but there is a problem.  Student loans cannot be included in bankruptcy.  Student loans currently are not dischargeable in bankruptcy.   They do therefore indeed last forever or until you allege “undue hardship” which is very hard to prove.  If these student loans were to be included in the lists of debts that people could discharge in bankruptcy then regular people would not be saddled with them forever.  They could escape them and move on in life with their student loans forgiven.

This could be done so much more easily and fairly in the context of bankruptcy than through some government blanket forgiveness.  Bankruptcy has been around for hundreds of years and the systems are in place to handle forgiveness of debt through the filing of bankruptcy.  There are trustees and judges to oversee each individual to make sure that the people asking for forgiveness really can’t afford to pay these debts back because the have neither the income or assets to do so.

In bankruptcy there are even proscribed exemptions that allow each person to keep a certain amount of property.  For most of the 99% this would amount to people keeping all of their property because most people don’t have more than these allowed exemption amounts.

This solution will also be so much more palatable to the American public.  It allows the forgiveness of the student loan debt but within the confines of the bankruptcy system.  Each individual would have to file for bankruptcy to get his student loan debt forgiveness.  He would then be examined by a Trustee and he would face a judge if fraud or other problems came up.   His income and expenses would be looked at to determine that he could not pay his debts with his current income and thus he is formally bankrupt. Those who could afford to pay the loans would then have to do so in some form but many many student loan debtors would be able to escape these loans if they were dischargeable in bankruptcy.  Bankruptcy is no blanket gift.

And it would be fair.  Many people with student loans cannot afford to pay these loans and they have very little hope of paying them back.  They are under employed or more likely unemployed and they cannot afford their living expenses let alone these student loans that have not even landed them a job.  It is simply not fair that a person who used their credit cards to excess can discharge those debts but the person trying to get an education and a job can never escape them even if they have no money and no job.

But many people will say that if we make student loans dischargeable in bankruptcy then student loans will be harder to get.   Maybe that is a good thing and people won’t borrow money for degrees that won’t lead to a job.  But I also believe that as credit cards are still obtainable by most people today and they are dischargeable in bankruptcy.  Bankruptcy has not stopped that industry and dischargeable student loans will not stop lenders from lending money for these loans either.

It also should not matter whether the loans are government or private.  If  they are private then the loans should be treated like credit cards and if government loans are owed then forgiveness of these loans is only fair in light of the bailouts given by the government to the financial industry.  Whether government or private though the effect is the same on people.  They can’t afford to pay them back in many cases.  (Remember also that IRS tax debt is dischargeable after only 3 years and the IRS still continues to operate).

And for further fairness you could make student loans dischargeable after a period of time say 10 or even 20 years.  If the student has not paid them back by that time then they are certainly having a problem and they probably can’t pay them back.  It is only fair to allow people to escape them in time.

I am a bankruptcy attorney practicing bankruptcy law in San Diego, CA.   For further information please visit my website at www.farquharlaw.com or www.freshsatartsandiego.com.   Or call my office for a free consultation at (619) 702-5015.  If you or someone you know are considering bankruptcy then get my Free e-book “13 THINGS YOU SHOULD DO TO PREPARE FOR YOUR BANKRUPCTY FILING” by e-mailing me at farquharesq@yahoo.com.

Will I pass the means test in bankruptcy but I have a spouse who makes good money but is not filing?

Good news!  That is okay!  Generally a non-filing spouse’s income is included in the bankruptcy means test as household income even if the spouse is not filing bankruptcy unless the spouses live apart.  But if your marriage is a recent marriage of less than six months then not all of the non-filing spouse’s income will be included in the household income calculation anyway.

If it is a marriage longer than six months then there is something called the marital adjustment which will allow you to reduce the amount of your spouse’s income that will appear on the means test.  The marital adjustment appears on line 17 of the means test form 22A.  There are several lines there but you can add an attachment as I did recently in a case.   This marital deduction allows you to deduct from your spouse’s income all of your spouse’s expenses that your spouse pays separately.

The first one is the deductions that come out of the non-filing spouse’s paycheck.  The non-filing spouse will have taxes, insurance, union dues and even a retirement deductions taken out of his or her paycheck.  The income for the spouse goes into the means test in the gross amount but the deductions are taken out here.  The retirement can be included here where it would not be for the filing spouse unless the filing spouse had a mandatory retirement.

Remember that this spouse is not filing bankruptcy and can spend money and take deductions as needed.  The non-filing spouse is not attempting to discharge their debts so the trustee has much less control over what they take on deductions than he or she would over a party that is filing for bankruptcy. But still the Trustee can challenge these marital deductions so it is good to have a bankruptcy attorney to analyze which ones can be justified.

The non-filing spouse can also take his or her credit card payments as marital deductions.  These payments will have to be made after the bankruptcy as they are not being discharged and thus they can be taken here.  If the non-filing spouse has a car of their own then they can take those car expenses there too if they have not already been taken in the car section of the means test.  The same would go for a separate cell phone.

There are other expenses too like separate student loan payments that the non-filing spouse can take.  Also if they have traveling or food expenses for themselves or if they pay child support for a child from a previous marriage then they can take those expenses.  Anything that is truly an expense just for them and was not paid on a regular basis for the household expenses for the debtor or the debtor’s dependants.

This gives you a lot of leeway for expenses to be included here that you or your attorney can come up with that meet this criteria.  Most people do have these expenses that are separate and distinct from the expenses that are contributed to the household.  This is because most people, even if married, these days have separate and distinct lives.  They may have many debts and obligations and expenses left over from before the marriage or just expenses that are truly just for them.

So don’t despair if you don’t pass the means test with your spouse’s income.  The marital deduction sections may make bankruptcy possible.  If it seems too complicated then contact a bankruptcy attorney who will help you decide which expenses can be taken on the marital deduction section of the bankruptcy means test.

I am a San Diego bankruptcy attorney.  For further questions please visit my websites at www.farquharlaw.com or www.freshstartsandiego.com.  Or call my office for a free consultation at (619) 702-5015.  Call now for free credit report and analysis!

For a free e-book on “13 things to do to prepare for your bankruptcy filing” please e-mail me at farquharesq@yahoo.com.

What debts are not dischargeable in bankruptcy?

The most common types of non-dischargeable debts are student loans, government fines and fees and some taxes, spousal and child support.  There are other categories such as debts incurred due to fraud but these are much less common.

Student loans– These debts are almost always not dischargeable.  Whether they are government backed student loans or loans from a private agency they are not dischargeable.  The 2005 BAPCA law saw to that.  Loans issued “for any educational purpose” are now all non-dischargeable in bankruptcy and student loans will pass through the bankruptcy unaffected and you will have to pay them.

There is a hardship discharge for student loans in bankruptcy but it is very hard to get.  To get a hardship discharge of student loans your attorney would have to bring an adversary proceeding in bankruptcy court.  This amounts to a mini-trial where all the facts of the hardship would have to be proven.

It is expensive and time-consuming to bring such a s case and there is no assurance that you will win.  In fact it is apparently very hard to win one of these trials at all.  There are stories of judges looking at a disabled debtor and telling them that they though they cannot work any more in their field, they could teach and earn money to pay the student loan back that way.

Government fines, fees, penalties, and some taxes– If you get a traffic fine or criminal fine levied by a court or other government agency then those fines are not dischargeable in bankruptcy.  That is easy but taxes are more difficult.  The main rule for taxes is the 3 year rule that states that 3-year-old income taxes are dischargeable in bankruptcy.

So in 2012 (after April 15th)  income taxes for 2008 would be dischargeable.  This is because these taxes were due in april of 2009.  Both state and federal  income taxes are dischargeable in bankruptcy if the meet this 3 year rule.  There are other rules too but this is the main one that applies to most people.

Other types of taxes are not dischargeable so consult with an attorney for advice on your tax situation.

Spousal and child support– Forget about discharging these.  You will have to pay your ex-spouse or your children after you get a support obligation levied against you.

Fraud– Debts where fraud is proven will not be dischargeable.  If you get sued and the plaintiff alleges fraud then you want to fight these cases because bankruptcy will not save you from having to pay.  The normal credit card suit usually will not contain a fraud allegation but credit card companies can allege fraud in a bankruptcy.  This usually occurs if you have very large recent charges on your cards for cash advances or luxury items.

If you have such charges then tell your attorney so he can wait some time to file or advise you on the possible consequences if you do file right away.

The good news is that if your debt does not fall into one of the non-dischargeable categories then it is probably dischargeable in a bankruptcy!

For more info. check out my websites at:   www.farquharlaw.com or www.freshstartsandiego.com.  Or call my office to speak toe for free about any bankruptcy or debt related issue  at (619) 702-5015.  Call now for free credit report and analysis!  I am a San Diego bankruptcy lawyer.  For a free e-book: “13 THINGS YOU SHOULD DO TO PREPARE FOR YOUR BANKRUPTCY FILING” please send a request by e-mail to: farquharesq@yahoo.com.

Bankruptcy and taxes

Most fines, fees and governmanet penalties are not dischargeable in Bankruptcy with the exception of 3 year old federal income taxes. They can be discharged if they were filed but not paid. Call our office for analysis of your taxes.